Archive for the ‘Workplace Policies’ Category

Reminder: Current Drug Use Not Protected Under ADA

A recent federal court decision is a good reminder that applicants or employees who currently use illegal drugs or marijuana or abuse alcohol are not protected under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) or the Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA). Conduct is key: The disease of addiction may be protected but misconduct is not […]

27 Jun 17 - Workplace Policies - Gail Cecchettini Whaley - No CommentsRead More »

Mandatory Poster and Education Requirements for California Barbering and Cosmetology Licensees July 1

To address workplace violations at California salons, California enacted two pieces of legislation that would provide salon workers, such as nail salon workers, with information on their employment rights. One legislative bill requires a mandatory poster; the other requires educational information for all licensees. Both bills are intended to educate business owners and workers about […]

26 Jun 17 - Posters and Notices, Workplace Policies - Gail Cecchettini Whaley - No CommentsRead More »

Closed for Memorial Day? Paying Wages to Employees

If an employer is closed on a payday that falls on a holiday listed in the California Government Code, such as Memorial Day, the employer can pay wages on the next business day. Of course, paying the day before the holiday is acceptable, as well. Private employers are not required to provide time off for […]

25 May 17 - Compensation, Workplace Policies - Gail Cecchettini Whaley - No CommentsRead More »

California Supreme Court Decides Important “One Day’s Rest in Seven” Questions

Under California law, employees are entitled to “one day’s rest in seven.” But what, exactly, does that mean? Today, the California Supreme Court answered three questions related to seventh day of work rules (Mendoza v. Nordstrom Inc., No. S224661 (May 8, 2017)). These questions are important for California employers and provide guidance for employers on […]

8 May 17 - Time Off, Workplace Policies - Gail Cecchettini Whaley - No CommentsRead More »

70 Is the New 65: Is the Retirement Age Increasing?

Thirty percent of U.S. workers ages 60 and older don’t plan to retire until age 70 or older, according to a recent CareerBuilder survey. Another 20 percent don’t know if they will ever be able to retire. Financial reasons typically are the top reason workers are postponing retirement, as older workers try to ensure a […]

27 Apr 17 - Discrimination, Workplace Policies - Gail Cecchettini Whaley - No CommentsRead More »