Employment Related Job-Killer Bill to Governor

Sep 2 2016 - Compensation, Heat Illness, Minimum Wage, Overtime, Time Off - HRWatchdog

Governor Employment Related Bills

Governor Brown has until September 30 to act on bills presented to him.

As the 2016 legislative session came to a close late Wednesday, 19 of 24 identified job killer bills had been effectively stopped through efforts of the California Chamber of Commerce, local chambers and the business community.

While many job killer bills were stopped, one employment-related job killer already was signed and another is on the governor’s desk. Governor Brown has until September 30 to act on bills presented to him.

  • SB 3 (Leno; D-San Francisco), which will increase the minimum wage in California to $15 per hour by 2022 (2023 for companies employing 25 or fewer people since there is a one-year implementation delay for small business), was sent to the Governor in April and was signed into law.
  • SB 654 (Jackson; D-Santa Barbara), which threatens to significantly harm small businesses in California who employ as few as 20 employees by imposing yet another protected leave of absence mandate, passed the Senate yesterday. CalChamber has identified SB 654 as a job killer because it will significantly harm small businesses in California who employ as few as 20 employees by requiring them to offer six weeks of protected leave for baby bonding. This proposed mandate comes on top of the current requirement that employers with only 5 employees allow 16 weeks of protected pregnancy-related leave.

The CalChamber is urging its members to contact Governor Brown and ask him to veto SB 654.

For more information on job killer bills stopped this year, visit CalChamber’s Top Story page. For the full job killer list, visit CalChamber’s job killer page.

Several other employment related bills have also been sent to Governor Brown for his signature or veto.  Some of these bills include:

  • AB 1066Overtime pay for agricultural employees
  • SB 1063 and AB 1676– Expansion of equal pay rules to prohibit an employer from paying any of its employees at wage rates less than the rates paid to employees of another race or ethnicity for substantially similar work and to specify that prior salary cannot, by itself, justify any disparity in compensation
  • SB 1167 – Heat illness prevention rules for indoor workers

This is just a partial list. Stay tuned to HRWatchdog and HRCalifornia for more updates regarding this legislation and other employment related legislation signed by the governor.

Keep an eye out for CalChamber’s annual new laws white paper, which will be released this Fall.

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